Sunday, December 11, 2016

Hasselback Sweet Potatoes

Sweet Potatoes are a traditional side dish for Thanksgiving and Christmas. In a previous Blog, 'Sweet Potato or Yam?', I wrote about the different colors of these tubers and history of the term 'yam'. I have added a new 'Label' for 'Sweet Potato' to my Blog. Click on the label for a quick reference... from recipes all the way to DIY slips and information on growing them.

Hasselback potatoes are commonly prepared using white fleshed potatoes. For anyone avoiding the nightshade family this is a delicious substitute. You may even find you prefer this easy, sweet and crispy version instead!
Use 2 wooden spoon handles

Use the dark orange flesh variety of sweet potato. They remain moist and sweet when baked. 
If you are not confident in your knife skills, use either two chop sticks or the handles of two wooden spoons to prevent slicing completely through. I have heard specialty kitchen shops sell a gadget for cutting hasselback potatoes but these methods will work just fine. 

HASSELBACK SWEET POTATOES
Sweet and moist on the inside and crispy on the outside. These sweet potatoes are the perfect side to serve at any festive occasion!

4 medium sweet potatoes
1-1/2 Tbsp. unsalted butter, melted
2 tsp. olive oil
1 tsp. minced fresh thyme 
1/2 tsp. granulated garlic
1/4 tsp. sea salt

1/4 tsp. freshly ground black pepper 
 
Preheat the oven to 425 F. Line a baking sheet with aluminum foil. Make a series of 1/8-inch slices along each potato, slicing 2/3 of the way through. (*See notes above using wooden spoon handles or chop sticks as a guide.)
Stir together the melted butter, oil, thyme, garlic, salt and pepper in a small bowl. Rub the potatoes all over with the mixture, getting in between the slices.
Place on the baking sheet and roast until the center of the potatoes are tender and the outside is crisp, 50 minutes to 1 hour. 

Halfway through the roasting time, remove the potatoes from the oven and run a fork gently across the tops of the potatoes, using light pressure, to fan the slices and separate them from one another. 

Till next time... Bon App├ętit!

Hasselback Sweet Potato
Photos and Recipe by Sally Rae 

1 comment:

  1. I am definitely trying this! And definitely using a guide. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete